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Geographica Helvetica
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Volume 70, issue 1
Geogr. Helv., 70, 27–32, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/gh-70-27-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Geogr. Helv., 70, 27–32, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/gh-70-27-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Interface 27 Jan 2015

Interface | 27 Jan 2015

AS17-148-22727 – Face à la Terre

A. Gillet A. Gillet
  • Département Géographie et Environnement, Faculté des sciences de la société, Université de Genève, Genève, Suisse

Abstract. Taken by the Apollo 17 crew on 7 December 1972, AS-17-148-22727 is one of the most famous photographs ever taken. Its iconic status has been commented on by many writers. In an article entitled "Contested Global Visions" (1994), Denis Cosgrove showed the huge impact it had on the way we think and depict the world and our presence in it. However, his analysis did not address the question of its prior reorientation and reframing, which are in essence cartographic operations. Our object therefore is to focus on the difference between zenithal and horizontal viewpoints, and eventually free ourselves from our mapping conventions when looking at the Earth. The work done by Genevan anarchist Charles Perron at the turn of the 20th century on the relief map of Switzerland with a scale of 100 000 is a major landmark in that direction.

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