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Considering time in climate justice research and practice deepens understanding of climate injustices to vulnerable people and of timely adaptation and resilience strategies. This is what the paper exemplifies by drawing on empirical results of farming communities in India and fishing communities in Norway. It suggests that qualitative scenarios based on the different facets of time as perceived by local groups are a valuable complement to existing quantifications of climate change projections.
GH | Articles | Volume 76, issue 1
Geogr. Helv., 76, 29–46, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/gh-76-29-2021

Special issue: Special edition Social Geography: Climate and marine justice:...

Geogr. Helv., 76, 29–46, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/gh-76-29-2021

Standard article 26 Feb 2021

Standard article | 26 Feb 2021

Considering time in climate justice

Judith Bopp and Anna Lena Bercht

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Short summary
Considering time in climate justice research and practice deepens understanding of climate injustices to vulnerable people and of timely adaptation and resilience strategies. This is what the paper exemplifies by drawing on empirical results of farming communities in India and fishing communities in Norway. It suggests that qualitative scenarios based on the different facets of time as perceived by local groups are a valuable complement to existing quantifications of climate change projections.
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